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NetDirector Enables Next-Generation Integration in Radiology with American Health Imaging

Tampa, FL – May 24, 2017 – NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has engaged in a rapid expansion strategy in the healthcare industry over the last few years. Recently, the Integration-Platform-as-a-Service (iPaaS) has completed implementation with American Health Imaging, a regional network of radiology providers across multiple states, to provide increased accessibility and data utility in their company.

American Health Imaging (AHI) began providing diagnostic imaging services in Decatur, Georgia, in 1998, and has since expanded to 21 locations. In each area, they distinguished themselves by providing excellent customer service and high quality diagnostic imaging for their patients and referring physicians. By partnering with NetDirector to provide cloud-based integration services, it is the goal of AHI to create an automation platform that will increase overall customer satisfaction through streamlined processes and to create internal manpower savings through enhancing their ability to scale the business without having to add staff.

“We want to provide the best possible patient care, to the maximum number of patients, while minimizing the need for human intervention in the process,” said Dan Balentine, Chief Operating Officer at AHI. “By utilizing the NetDirector integration, it has allowed us to take our staff’s focus off of the day to day busywork, and shift focus to providing unmatched patient care.”

With traditional integrations, a company like AHI could be paying upwards of $20,000 plus an 18% annual maintenance fee for each vendor that would be integrated with AHI’s EMR and other in-house systems. For AHI, this was clearly not the optimum solution. Several vendors might not have the volume of transactions to justify the integration cost, creating a system built around the exception and not the constant. NetDirector’s one-to-many integration approach allowed AHI to integrate once with NetDirector, and use that single integration to connect to the entire hub of HealthData Exchange participants.

Three main technologies formed the backbone of the AHI-NetDirector integration – HealthLogix, Exchange EDI, and IntScripts.

HealthLogix Integration – Patient Check-In, Appointment Confirmation, Patient Billing

AHI utilizes a patient engagement platform called HealthLogix to help follow up with patients after exams or appointments, confirm scheduling, prompt for surveys, create a seamless check-in process, and more. The cloud-based integration model helped AHI bring this information directly into their Fuji Radiology Information System (RIS) and patient billing databases, to keep patient records current and to leverage the data they were collecting most efficiently, and allowed the utilization of HealthLogix’s full functionality such as automating check-in procedures at a digital kiosk, and more.

Exchange EDI Integration – Insurance Coverage Confirmation & Verification

Additionally, in a time where high-deductible insurance policies are increasingly commonplace, insurance confirmation simply isn’t enough information. AHI utilized NetDirector to connect with Exchange EDI, which not only confirms the participation in an insurance policy or group but analyzes policy levels and remaining deductibles. This allows patients and providers alike to understand the patient’s responsibility up front – the transparency provided by this data allows for accurate collection of copays during visits, reduced collection costs down the line, and overall reduced revenue leakage for providers.

IntScripts Integration – Physician Referrals and Radiology Communication Integration

Finally, it was critical to make the ordering process for their referring physician population as simple as possible, so an integration was performed with IntScripts, which provided the ability to directly receive orders from the referrer’s EHR and have the results automatically dropped right into the patient’s chart.  This automation eliminates the traditional manual processes that were previously encountered by both AHI and referring physicians.

For patients, the NetDirector integration platform provides not only an elevated level of understanding of their coverage and responsibility through stronger integration between provider and vendor, but also makes life easier for their primary care doctor or other referring physician to communicate and refer patients. This increases the likelihood of single-service care, as primary care physicians are more likely to refer patients as needed, and patients can trust they are receiving the right treatment for them.

“The integration that we have created for American Health Imaging is a model case for the value of cloud-based integration in healthcare,” said Harry Beisswenger, NetDirector CEO. “When we set out to enter the healthcare industry, our primary goals were to reduce costs for providers, increase potential care level provided to patients, and create an environment of data transparency and communication. AHI’s integration has accomplished all of this and more.”

Company Bio:

NetDirector provides a secure cloud-based data and document exchange solution for the healthcare and mortgage banking industries to deliver seamless data integration between parties. NetDirector bridges gaps created by disparate systems & technologies by allowing companies at any location to share data & documents securely over a single internet connection with any other member of the ecosystem. Our approach allows trading partners to collaborate and exchange data in a seamless, bi-directional, real-time manner. With security and longevity as a focus, NetDirector is a certified HIPAA Compliant company, a 6-year member of the prominent Inc. 5000, and currently processes more than 8 million transactions per month.

Healthcare Innovation: New Threats, New Technology

On the heels of the May 12 WannaCry malware attack that infected more than 300,000 computers in at least 150 countries — the largest hack in nearly a decade — investigators continue to evaluate what happened while victims assess the resulting damage.

The exploit emerged as ransomware, which encrypted files stored in unprotected computers and effectively held them hostage to demands for money in exchange for decryption.

“The suspected syndicated attack is … using a particularly nasty form of malware that can move through a corporate network from a single entry point,” noted Simon Crosby, chief technology officer of cybersecurity firm Bromium. He added that healthcare organizations, governments, police and fire departments and military organizations are “massively vulnerable.

The outbreak started in Europe and in one of the most significant impact zones affected about 20 percent of the United Kingdom’s publicly funded National Health Service. Routine surgeries and outpatient appointments were canceled, while seven hospitals had to divert emergency patients due to disruptions, BBC reported, although media accounts said patient data had not been accessed.

WannaCry manipulated flaws in Microsoft’s Windows operating system that had not been updated by many of the targets. While analysts believe elements of the malicious software had been leaked by a hacking group from a trove of cyber-attack tools held by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), Microsoft reportedly was aware of the Windows weakness and had issued a free fix on March 14.

“Say what you want to say about the NSA or disclosure process, but this is one in which what’s broken is the system by which we fix,” commented Zeynep Tufeki, a professor at the University of North Carolina.

Hackers target healthcare

The 2017 Healthcare Breach Report, compiled by data protection firm Bitglass from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services records, reveals that 328 U.S. healthcare organizations disclosed data breaches in 2016, up from 268 the prior year. All five of the largest breaches were the result of hacking and IT incidents in 2016, according to the report. What’s more, network servers were almost always the targets for hacking-related breaches.

Robert Herjavec, CEO of a global information security company (but perhaps more widely known as one of the venture capitalist investors on the television show Shark Tank), recently told Healthcare IT News that the industry needs to prioritize a proactive approach to security.

Herjavec emphasized that providers are vulnerable to hacks in part because they are highly dependent on information systems, but it is difficult to keep them up-to-date and refreshed with current security patches. He added that large projects “can take years, and security considerations and proactive protection often fall by the wayside during these transitions.”

In general terms, he recommends increased use of account access management tools while restricting access to HIM systems to the greatest extent possible. Additionally, as shown in the WannaCry incident, operating systems must be updated regularly and endpoints patched aggressively — all while staff and clinicians receive training on cybersecurity risks and challenges.

NetDirector recognizes that unknowns in cybersecurity will always create gaps between emerging exploits and preventive measures. That’s all the more reason for the company to stay ahead of the curve in its technology development. With its HealthData Exchange platform, for example, clinical and financial data move electronically among disparate systems via a cloud-based solution that fully complies with HIPAA and SOC2 standards. NetDirector securely processes over 10 million data and document transactions per month for its healthcare clients.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

NetDirector Launches Powerful Integration with Equator® for Orders and Deliverables

Tampa, FL – May 9, 2017 – NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has spent several months working alongside Equator, the leading provider of default software solutions for servicers, real estate agents, vendors and other mortgage and real estate industry professionals. The work has yielded a powerful zero-footprint integration option for default servicing firms utilizing Equator.

Equator’s infrastructure software as a service (iSaaS) solutions include EQ Workstation®, EQ Marketplace®, Midsource™ and EQAgent®/EQVendor® portals, which can be used a la carte or as an end-to-end solution. Equator’s REO, short sale and loss mitigation modules processed over $21 billion in transactions in 2015, and have processed more than $315 billion in transactions since its inception. Currently, 4 of the top 5 U.S servicers and the largest holder of real estate are on the Equator platform. With such a high volume of mortgage banking transactions taking place with Equator, it was an easy next step for NetDirector to develop the one-to-many style integration that has fueled their integration platform-as-a-service (iPaaS) business model tailored to the Equator platform.

“NetDirector has worked very closely with us to not only develop, but to thoroughly test this powerful integration suite for default servicing attorneys,” said James N. Vinci, Chief Technology Officer of the Equator business. “We’re excited to collaborate with them, and we believe this collaboration will generate serious efficiency for attorney firms utilizing Equator.”

The initial integration launch includes “Orders” and “Deliverables”, which resemble the referrals and events that are utilized by other industry standard software interfaces in the default servicing sphere. The “Deliverables” also allow for certain documents to be uploaded and other transactions and processes are on the table for future development. Automating these transactions through a cloud-based integration platform provides increases to efficiency through reduced data entry and automated processes. It also significantly reduces the labor stresses of developing and maintaining the integration internally at the attorney’s cost.

“Our ecosystem continues to expand with yet another powerhouse in the industry as we welcome Equator as a new participant,” said Harry Beisswenger, NetDirector CEO. “Our goal is to provide the integrations to default servicing firms that offer the most value, and there has been a major demand for this service. We look forward to the prospect of further data and document integration with the Equator platform in the future.”

Company Bio:

NetDirector provides a secure cloud-based data and document exchange solution for the healthcare and mortgage banking industries to deliver seamless data integration between parties. NetDirector bridges gaps created by disparate systems & technologies by allowing companies at any location to share data & documents securely over a single internet connection with any other member of the ecosystem. Our approach allows trading partners to collaborate and exchange data in a seamless, bi-directional, real-time manner. With security and longevity as a focus, NetDirector is a certified SOC 2 Type II Compliant company, a 6-year member of the prominent Inc. 5000, and currently, processes more than 8 million transactions per month.

Integration Can Power the Tools for Patient Engagement

Roughly 70 percent of health systems, hospitals and physician practices proactively work toward getting patients more involved in their own care, according to a 2016 NEJM Catalyst survey. However, considering the drive to implement and deliver value-based care, industry observers are wondering why that number isn’t closer to 100 percent.

“[We] need to engage patients outside the exam room with frequent, creative interactions that do not have to always include their physicians,” according to Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD, and Namita Mohta, MD, who analyzed the survey results.

Patient portals, secure email, online/mobile scheduling, patient-generated data and social networks lead the way among engagement initiatives currently being used at scale, according to respondents.

Nonetheless, portals in particular tend to be “systems of record, not systems of engagement,” observes analyst Brian Eastwood of Chilmark Research, a health IT advisory firm. Today’s portals aren’t optimized for value-based care or population health management because they’re geared toward the individual and don’t encourage behavior change, he adds.

Forward-looking solutions must be built on a broader engagement model that loops in coordinated community care teams and enables bi-directional information flow, Eastwood explains. “The point solutions that consumers use to access the healthcare system will get bigger,” he continues. “We need to try to connect to these solutions in some way — and integration is the best we can hope for.”

A pathway to future success

Design and usability will be the main drivers of behavior changes in patient engagement, predicts Sean Duffy, CEO of Omada Health, a tech-based company targeting diabetes care through analytically identified trends.

“It’s about fine-tuning and personalization, [which will spawn] an incredible wave of potential in the way we work to improve the health of the country,” Duffy tells FierceHealthcare. Optimizing the way patients interact with engagement technology is a core part of the process so that a wide range of individuals can be effectively served.

And there’s good reason to expect positive patient response to emerging engagement technology. CDW’s 2017 Patient Engagement Perspective Study finds 70 percent of patient respondents saying they’ve become more knowledgeable about their personal medical information because of online access. Half of the same sample said they’ve noticed increased engagement with their own healthcare.

At the same time, it’s essential to view patient engagement as a two-way street. To wit, 67 percent of providers surveyed by CDW consider patient engagement to be an important part of improving overall care and the top motivating factor in spurring their respective organizations into action.

Indeed, leading healthcare institutions such as Johns Hopkins Medicine are making sure employees understand patient data and know how to communicate it. That behavior is “becoming very ingrained in the way we do our work,” says chief patient experience officer Lisa Allen.

NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange platform supports such initiatives by electronically moving clinical and financial data among disparate systems — transparently mapping it to the correct format of the recipient. In this way, HealthData Exchange serves as an engine for integrating engagement technologies, increasing the likelihood of not only utilization, but also the accuracy of data circulating in multiple environments without human intervention.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

What’s Top-of-Mind for Healthcare Provider Connectivity?

Healthcare connectivity covers a lot of virtual territories, evolving technologies, and boots-on-the-ground personnel. On the human side alone, stakeholders involved in the creation, exchange, and use of health information include individuals, patients, physicians, hospitals, payers, suppliers and ancillary service providers.

Concurrently, healthcare’s ecosystem relies on technical standards, policies, and protocols “to enable seamless and secure capture, discovery, exchange and utilization of information” in all its various forms among stakeholder parties, according to the HIMSS Interoperability & HIE Committee.

Healthcare organizations have been hammering away at this multi-faceted challenge for decades, making incremental progress. “The next step is taking data and using it to create a more accurate picture of the patient that drives better healthcare decisions,” observes Carla Smith, HIMSS executive vice president.

Industry-wide activity is trending toward population health initiatives. Case in point: Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI) in Englewood, Colo., has stepped up its population health strategy through the use of advanced data analytics. Since rolling out the program, CHI has cut pneumonia mortality by 21 percent; catheter-associated urinary tract infections by 27 percent; surgical site infections (SSIs) following colon surgery by 34 percent; and SSIs following hysterectomy by 45 percent.

Concurrently, Atrius Health in Newton, Mass., is focusing on lowering inappropriate hospitalizations and reducing lengths of stay in nursing facilities. Atrius pairs patient histories from its EHR with claims data for alternative payment contracts to identify at-risk groups who could benefit from early interventions (e.g., those with chronic kidney disease) while also managing patients already diagnosed with chronic conditions, reports Becker’s Hospital Review. The goal is to develop customized and comprehensive care and treatment plans.

Areas of opportunity

Aside from these types of leading-edge programs, hospitals and health systems are hard at work in more fundamental areas of health information exchange. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), in a 2016 statutorily required report to Congress, noted that about three-quarters of hospitals could electronically exchange health information with outside providers, highlighted by a spike of 23 percent between 2013 and 2014. However, physician practices lagged behind in their ability to electronically share patient health information in the same manner.

At the same time, HHS said it will pursue incentives “to stimulate more collaborative business arrangements and uninterrupted information flow.” In broad terms, these financial levers will be intended to motivate higher-value care, reward teamwork and integration in the delivery of care, pave the way for more effective coordination of providers across settings, and “harness the power of information” in improving care across populations of patients.

All this needs to happen in concert with more fully engaged patients. While 72 percent of hospitals enable patients to electronically request an amendment to their own health information, other areas must come up to speed. For instance, only about 40 percent of hospital patients can request prescription refills or schedule appointments online, and just slightly over half of hospitals allow patients to send and receive secure messages electronically.

Increasingly, healthcare providers are looking to build out capabilities in a unified, streamlined ecosystem. NetDirector’s cloud-based HealthData Exchange platform is designed to make this level of connectivity a reality. HealthData Exchange allows hospitals and physician practices to make a single connection that instantly gives them access to dozens — and potentially hundreds — of other providers and vendors via pre-defined integrations. NetDirector currently processes more than 10 million data and document transactions per month.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

NetDirector Exceeds Demanding Security Standards with SOC2 and HIPAA Certifications

TAMPA, Fla., March 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has recently completed work with A-LIGN to undergo rigorous and valuable security certifications. NetDirector was recently awarded attestations in compliance with HIPAA and SOC2 Type II standards, the leading security standards in Healthcare and Mortgage Banking, respectively.

The SOC 2, or Service Organization Controls 2, is an examination under AICPA standards designed for technology service companies to demonstrate controls around data security and processing integrity. The SOC 2 reports are intended to meet the needs of a broad range of users that need to understand internal controls at a service organization as it relates to security, availability, process integrity, confidentiality and privacy. The Type II report is a report on management’s description of a service organization’s system and the suitability of the design and operating effectiveness of controls.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA, defines policies and procedures, as well as processes, which are required of companies that store, process, or handle electronic health information that is considered “protected” (ePHI). HIPAA compliance is increasingly valuable to both technology service providers and integrators like NetDirector, as well as providers, electronic health records systems, billing platforms, and others integrating and utilizing healthcare data.

Both the SOC 2 and the HIPAA audit were performed by Tampa-headquartered nationwide security and compliance solutions provider A-LIGN. A-LIGN specializes in helping businesses across a variety of industries navigate the complexities of specific audits and security assessments, and both the SOC 2 and HIPAA reports of A-LIGN’s findings can be made available to prospective or current customers.

“NetDirector displayed the necessary controls in their HIPAA and SOC 2 attestation reports,” said Scott Price of A-LIGN. “Their security and management teams were great to work with throughout the process. There is a strong attention to detail in the organization.”

In addition to the in-house attestations, the data centers utilized by NetDirector through Peak10 maintain the same security standards or higher in all aspects of their company. Many technology companies have recently been brought to light as claiming true “compliance” in their organization, when they really mean that their data center has gone through the rigorous examination. At NetDirector, the belief is in transparency and clear communication regarding security, including compliance audits at all ends of the process.

“I am very proud of our team for successfully completing these important 3rd party audits,” said Harry Beisswenger, NetDirector CEO. “Both the mortgage default servicing industry and the health data environment come with very unique security and compliance requirements, and these certifications and reports strengthen the trust that our clients place in us to safely integrate their platforms and transform their data.”

Company Bio:

NetDirector provides a secure cloud-based data and document exchange solution for the healthcare and mortgage banking industries to deliver seamless data integration between parties. NetDirector bridges gaps created by disparate systems & technologies by allowing companies at any location to share data & documents securely over a single internet connection with any other member of the ecosystem. Our approach allows trading partners to collaborate and exchange data in a seamless, bi-directional, real-time manner. NetDirector currently processes more than 8 million transactions per month.

2016 Customer Survey Results

The results are in from 2016!

Each year we ask our customers to complete a short but informative Customer Service Survey so that we can continue to provide them with the high-level of service they have come to know and expect. The goal of the survey is to utilize feedback from our customers to fuel growth and transformation where it is most needed in our company.

This year, we presented the results of the 2016 Customer Survey at our Client Conference in January of 2017, and we’re excited to publish them for all to see.

We asked each customer to rate their NetDirector Integration Analyst, our Technical Support team, and to provide feedback on the quality of service they have received over the last year. We are pleased to report NetDirector scored a 4.8 out of 5 on Overall Satisfaction, with a 100% Satisfaction rate among existing clients!

Customer Survey Meter_2015 V2 600x380

Overall Customer Service Experience Ranked 4.8 out of 5 for 2016.

The survey questions included:

  1. How long have you been a NetDirector customer?
  2. How many times have you interacted with your Integration Analyst in the last 12 months?
  3. Please rate your Integration Analyst based on the following…Availability, Knowledge, Professionalism, Timeliness and Overall Level of Service.
  4. Please rate our Technical Support based on the following…Availability, Knowledge, Professionalism, Timeliness and Overall Level of Service.
  5. How would you rate your overall experience with NetDirector?
  6. Please share any comments or feedback with us.

 

We also had some great comments submitted about our team we’d love to share with you!

Always a pleasure to work with the staff at NetDirector. Very knowledgable and responsive to business needs, and will offer solutions.
Paul is an excellent analyst. We could not be happier with his performance.
In regard to service, I don’t think you could find anyone better than Melissa. She’s been instrumental in our success with using NetDirector.
NetDirector is always very responsive and knowledgeable.
We are very pleased with the level of service. Nicoles is very responsive and great to work with.

Exceptional customer service is our top priority. We encourage feedback on our performance and for convenience – please use the following link for your comments: comments@netdirector.biz.

Healthcare Data That Makes a Difference

Physicians and hospitals in Kansas are pilot-testing a new analytic tool that gives them access to clinical data for patients across all providers linked to the state’s health information exchange (HIE).

The technology enables providers to pull reports from a dashboard package built around high-risk patients, preventive care initiatives, readmissions and disease registries. The aim is to help physicians deliver higher quality, more efficient and less expensive patient care.

“I can look at my patient population and see those patients who are in trouble,” explains Joe Davison, MD, a family doctor practicing in Wichita who participates in the project. “I may not have known they were in trouble, but when I look at the analytic reports that represent my panel of patients, I see I have a certain number who have poor to no control of their diabetes. I can identify those patients, extract a list [of them], and then I can act on that information.”

Data sharing on the upswing

Separately — and on a larger scale — the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is funding a 12-month data-exchange initiative. The Patient Centered Data Home (PCDH) Heartland Initiative hit a significant milestone in December 2016. The Indiana Health Information Exchange, the Michiana Health Information Network, and the East Tennessee Health Information Network agreed to support data sharing among their HIEs to ensure that patients’ healthcare records would follow them wherever they seek care.

Seven HIEs across five states will be exchanging health information at the completion of the project, which also includes Great Lakes Health Connect, based in Grand Rapids, Michigan; HealthLinc (Bloomington, Indiana); Kentucky Health Information Exchange (Frankfort, Kentucky); and The Health Collaborative (Cincinnati, Ohio).

The project looks to demonstrate that a standards-based approach can cost-effectively, scalably and seamlessly deliver data across state lines, health systems, and referral regions. “Knowing about medical events that occur outside their local area will allow hometown physicians to build more complete patient medical records, thus providing more informed care for their patients,” notes Leigh Sterling, executive director of the East Tennessee network.

Payer projects

Health insurers are also following a similar track. For example, Aetna recently announced a collaborative effort with the Camden (New Jersey) Coalition of Healthcare Providers to expand the use of integrated data among providers. In doing so, the Neighborhood Health Compass project expects to improve outcomes for individuals with complex health and social needs.

At the federal level, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) provides actionable government data to clinicians in an effort to promote innovation and best practices. CMS’ Comprehensive Primary Care initiative, which ran from 2012 to 2016, included the continuous use of data to guide improvement at practice sites in Colorado, Oklahoma and the Ohio/Kentucky region. Data-aggregation specialists worked with payers in each area to combine data and streamline its delivery in a secure manner.

Providers “were able to quickly and easily identify gaps in patient care and see exactly which services their patients were receiving outside their practices,” according to Patrick Conway, MD, CMS’ deputy administrator for innovation and quality. Having information across multiple payers helped to build provider confidence in selecting appropriate interventions, identifying trends and assigning care management resources.

In a similar way, NetDirector’s integration platform can take existing healthcare data and allow it to be shared easily and effectively, with a degree of automation. This allows data that has been collected and stored to become a tool for achieving provider success and enhanced patient care.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

Is Interoperability Disruption Inevitable in Healthcare?

The College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) closed out 2016 with a cautionary message regarding future interoperability challenges. CHIME’s Board of Trustees raised concern over “persisting lack of interoperability among and across our disparate health system” in a December 16 letter to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Andy Slavitt.

While generally praising CMS for giving healthcare organizations more flexibility in the use of IT pursuant to new physician payment models, CHIME recommends a single set of standards to facilitate more seamless data exchange.

“We do not believe interoperability will become widespread without more uniformity in the use of health data standards,” the letter states. “A stronger state of interoperability facilitated by a uniform set of standards, including a national solution ensuring accurate patient identification, is our best hope for driving better care.”

Where things stand

At its highest level, “semantic interoperability” supports the electronic exchange of patient summary information among caregivers and other authorized parties via potentially distinct electronic health record (EHR) systems and other systems to improve healthcare delivery.

Progress is being made, argues Sam Weir, MD, lead informatics physician at UNC Health Care in North Carolina: “Physicians are increasingly working in large healthcare systems with relatively mature EHRs. These systems are working with their EHR vendors to implement the nationwide interoperability roadmap as quickly as they can.”

Nonetheless, that same trend favoring migration toward mainstream, integrated EHRs such as Epic Cerner and Allscripts may actually hinder longer-term interoperability success, according to Mike Restuccia, chief information officer at Penn Medicine. In the meantime, he agrees with the need for widely adopted and deployed semantic, data model and data definition standards.

Mario Hyland, the founder of IT consultancy Aegis, warns that interoperability obstacles are just starting to come to light — as in the case of hospitals using separate EHRs being able to exchange data until a software upgrade by one or both organizations causes an interface problem. He estimates that 35 to 40 percent of all visits result in an interoperability request, with achievement more likely to be “broken than solved.”

The path ahead

Former Apple CEO John Scully, who’s now chairman of pharmacy benefit management firm RxAdvance, and Humana CEO Bruce Broussard recently urged a push for disruption in healthcare through changes in behaviors, data analytics, interoperability and aligned incentives. They cite breakthroughs in the implementation of standards-based protocols such as Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) in support of healthcare alliance efforts. The executives also point to data exchange between payers and providers enabling real-time, proactive alerts to the prescribing physicians to prevent drug-drug interactions or other potentially harmful outcomes.

Interoperability in such forms will lead to a more holistic approach to patient care, they predict, with mobile devices and other technology combining with data analytics to open up a deeper level of personalization.

NetDirector factors into this discussion as a proven disrupter in the area of healthcare data exchange — especially one-to-many integration that allows for ease of adoption and quick implementation. That approach allows providers to focus on patients care with confidence that technology such as NetDirector’s cloud-based HealthData Exchange will seamlessly handle the movement of clinical and financial data among disparate systems, and deliver it when and where needed.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

Healthcare Data in 2017

IT executives in healthcare face an expanding array of challenges in 2017 as the industry takes initial steps away from transactional-based, fee-for-service models and toward reimbursements tied to measures of value and quality. The clock has started ticking on Medicare reform’s implementation, with provider performance data gathered this year providing the basis for physician payments in 2019.

“To succeed in the value-based environment, health systems need to invest heavily in technology,” reports the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions.

The following areas should see significant impact.

IT as a key enabler

Healthcare organizations are recognizing IT’s mission-critical role in ensuring continuous high availability of systems and support of operational commitments, according to the 2016 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. Fifty-two percent of healthcare CIOs expect their IT budget to increase over the next 12 months, compared to 45 percent across all industries. The boards of healthcare companies also place a higher priority than their counterparts in other industries on increasing operational efficiencies, improving business processes and delivering business intelligence/ analytics. Additionally, the report finds that “cloud and other collaborative digital technology enhancements have improved health IT access, scalability, reliability and sustainability.”

Interoperability essentials

Healthcare CIOs are enthusiastic about the transition to value-based models of care, but they admit it will be a tough task to actually implement population health management programs that can pull data from multiple organizations and analyze that information with a predictive component. Interoperability of data and technology will be an essential lever in making population health and wellness a reality. “Continuity-of-care documents, electronic health records (EHRs) and other types of data must all come together in an organized, orderly marriage,” observes Transcend Insights, Humana’s population health subsidiary. “A health information exchange for data and Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) for application interfacing [will be] the easiest route forward.”

Interoperability also tops the list of EHR development projects slated for 2017, according to a Healthcare IT News survey of health technology executives. Specifically, respondents say top EHR projects will be geared toward improving interoperability, workflow and usability, as well as adding population health tools and migrating to the cloud. “EHRs were put in basically as dumb data communication systems without emphasis on exchange and workflow,” explains John Halamka, MD, CIO at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess health system. “But because of payment reform, we have incentives to do data exchange. Different things are bubbling to the top.”

Opportunity in digital health

Digital health tools such as health-related apps, activity trackers and smart watches have the potential to help consumers become more engaged in their own health. Unfortunately, that’s not happening yet. For instance, 75 percent of consumers who use mobile or Internet-connected health apps are willing to share the data they collect with their provider; however, only 32 percent say that type of exchange actually takes place, according to a digital health survey conducted by HealthMine. Additionally, 60 percent of digital health users say they have electronic health records, but only 22 percent use them to make medical decisions. HealthMine CEO Bryce Williams says, “Digital health is still crossing the chasm from lifestyle and fitness management to chronic disease and holistic healthcare management.” Williams looks for that gap to close during 2017 as health plan sponsors apply collected consumer health data to gain insights and manage populations toward improved health.

Tamper-proof technology

On December 12, Quest Diagnostics revealed that an unauthorized party obtained protected health information of approximately 34,000 individuals via an Internet application. Accessed data included names, dates of birth and lab results — but not Social Security numbers or credit card, insurance or other financial information. As such, it was a relatively mild intrusion measured against other data breaches during 2016. In comparison, a hacking of health insurer Anthem compromised tens of millions of patient records, all of which were stored unencrypted in a centralized database. In a New York Times op-ed, cybercrime expert Kathryn Haun and healthcare futurist Eric Topol call for a move away from health systems “storing and owning all our data.” They advocate for an encrypted data platform known as blockchain, which would “give patients digital wallets containing all their medical data, continually updated, that they can share at will.” The co-authors note that the private and academic sectors are working on the emerging technology.

Data in motion

Girish Pancha, CEO and founder of data flow management company StreamSets, views data as “the final frontier in the quest for continuous IT operations.” Pancha predicts 2017 will bring recognition of data management “as a living, breathing operation that must run reliably and automatically on a continuous basis” — on par with how IT oversees applications, networks and security. Organizations will need to analyze potential changes to their processes, tooling and structure to ensure the availability and accuracy of data in motion, he adds.

All told, it will be an eventful year with healthcare organizations planning for important challenges in their respective data and integration environments. NetDirector stands ready to assist with its proven cloud-based HealthData Exchange, which moves clinical records between providers and all trading partners in their ecosystem.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.