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Healthcare Data Integration Leads to Better and More Affordable Care

The United States continues to outspend other industrialized countries on healthcare, mainly due to higher drug prices, increasing doctor/nurse salaries, rising hospital administrative costs and escalating fees for many medical services, according to a newly published study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Per capita U.S. healthcare spending is a stark outlier, 25 percent above the next most expensive nation (Switzerland) and an astounding 145 percent over the median for countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), from which the Johns Hopkins researchers drew their data.

Unfortunately, extravagance doesn’t translate to better healthcare access for U.S. patients. In fact, just the opposite is true. The U.S. trails OECD median totals in numbers of practicing physicians and nurses per 1,000 population, as well as new medical school graduates per 100,000 population and acute care hospital beds per 1,000 population.

What can be done to counter and redirect these trends toward a sustainable path of affordable and accessible care? The answers appear to be a mix of organizational pragmatism and technological leverage.

Operational Integration

Some health systems see vertical alignment with managed care as an important first step toward reining in costs. For example, earlier this month, West Virginia University Health System (operating as WVU Medicine) and The Health Plan announced their intent to form “a fully integrated healthcare delivery and financing system” for patients in the Mountain State. The Health Plan, a nonprofit managed care organization, will become a subsidiary of WVU Medicine.

WVU Health CEO Albert Wright says true cost control and coordination can be achieved through provider-payer alignment. An integrated model enables providers to care for the sick while also emphasizing prevention and wellness among the general population.

Advisory firm Deloitte notes that provider-sponsored health plans make up only about 10 percent of the total market; however, such plans have tremendous promise based on built-in advantages over sometimes adversarial provider-payer affiliations. “They control key parts of the delivery system and have more engaged relationships with their patient consumers,” states a Deloitte brief on provider-health plan integration. “They can employ their market beachheads to the health plan arena to generate new income streams that fuel improvements in their clinical effectiveness and patient experience.”

Technology Makes a Difference

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) has more than 20 years’ experience running its own health plan in Western Pennsylvania. Enrollment in UPMC insurance products now exceeds 3.3 million members, making it one of the largest and fastest-growing provider-owned health plans in the nation. “The partnership generally focuses on opportunities to improve care first, and then is followed by development of payment models to support those efforts,” a UPMC article explains.

Particularly significant has been UPMC’s progress in addressing the scourge of opioid addiction in its patient community. According to UPMC, data silos have been integrated to make real-time information available to clinical decision-makers. Health plan data generates profiles and benchmarks of provider prescribing behavior, identifies patients with opiate usage patterns suggestive of dependence or abuse, and shares with emergency department physicians a view of opiate prescription refills at all pharmacies. In the second half of 2017, UPMC providers lowered opioid prescribing by 18 percent compared to the prior year.

From a broader view, health IT integration initiatives serve as cultural forces in making patient information available electronically when and where needed. In doing so, health IT improves care quality while making its delivery more cost-effective. Providers directly benefit from having accurate and complete information about a patient’s health, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Whether responding to a routine visit or a medical emergency, providers who can access integrated information have the ability to diagnose problems sooner, reduce medical errors, and administer safer care at lower costs.

What’s more, health IT integration supports improved care coordination and dissemination of patient status information with family members and other caregivers.

NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange platform seamlessly automates and secures the sharing of information and documents across the healthcare ecosystem, from small physician practices to multi-facility health systems and points in between. In an industry gearing up for more prevalent integration, NetDirector’s technology brings the advantage of a reliable and tested platform.

To learn more about HealthData Exchange, contact us or request a free demo.

Healthcare IT Boosts Consumer Engagement Component

Healthcare IT Boosts Consumer Engagement Component

Healthcare providers are undergoing a fundamental transformation by making their services increasingly accessible and adaptable to consumer preferences. Over half of all patient transactions are already handled online, virtually or through an app, according to tech giant Oracle. And that percentage will only grow as a rising share of younger consumers demand new ways to address their healthcare needs through mobile connections and on-demand systems.

“People are taking more ownership of their healthcare, and they expect user-friendly technologies to help them do so,” says Paul Black, CEO of electronic health record (EHR) vendor Allscripts. “The solutions that deliver what consumers want are the ones that will be successful.”

Competing with Technology Titans

Healthcare has already drawn deep interest and investment from digital-sector headliners such as Amazon and Google. These non-traditional participants seek to disrupt the marketplace by helping consumers manage wellness and engage with providers, Black points out. For example, last year Amazon began offering a discount on its Prime delivery service to Medicaid beneficiaries, and now — through the acquisition of online pharmacy PillPack — has rolled out one-day free shipping on prescriptions to Prime customers in many ZIP codes across the country.

Accordingly, healthcare-entrenched companies like Allscripts know they must keep pace with consumer-focused technologies, in particular by expanding mobile outreach capabilities. Consumers want to be active in their own care “before, during and after visits” through mobile connections, emphasizes Black.

Along those lines, Allscripts’ recently enhanced FollowMyHealth patient platform enables SMS messages and alerts without consumers having to log into a provider’s portal.

Ephraim McDowell Health, an integrated healthcare delivery system serving about 120,000 residents in central Kentucky, will use FollowMyHealth as part of a “pro-consumer” strategy to make it convenient for patients to stay informed about their health. The health system favors a unified approach to patient engagement over deployment of multiple, disconnected smartphone apps.

“We as an industry must be prepared for the evolving healthcare IT landscape and start now on creating intuitive access to our services, a simplified method of enabling personalized outreaches, and improve how we coordinate a patient’s care journey,” explains Gary Neat, CIO at Ephraim McDowell.

Allscripts reports more than 40 million patients nationwide have connected with providers through FollowMyHealth. The company says clients using the technology have actively engaged with up to 70 percent of patients through the platform.

Following the Trendlines

Newly released findings from a survey of 1,000 healthcare leaders rank consumerism as a top-level concern across the industry. The report recognizes the transformation of patients to consumers who seek lower costs and greater convenience from providers. As a result, “providers will have to work harder than ever to find and retain their patient populations,” the survey concludes.

Additionally, personalized patient engagement will accelerate population health initiatives during 2019, according to Becker’s Hospital Review. In particular, voice-driven consumer communications that mimic natural conversations — whether reminders to schedule appointments and screenings or to prepare for an upcoming procedure — will empower patients to make informed decisions and take action about their health. The goal is to improve outcomes “on a scale that would be impossible with existing staff,” Becker’s notes.

As providers pursue new ways to engage with consumers, new components will be added to existing technologies and CIOs’ responsibilities. Knowing that core systems and data-exchange mechanisms are running at peak efficiency in a truly integrated fashion will free up health IT executives to apply their expertise and resources to emerging consumer-centric technologies.

NetDirector’s cloud-based HealthData Exchange complements current IT investments while streamlining clinical workflow and communications throughout a provider’s extended community. To learn more about the platform, contact us or request a free demo.

How Artificial Intelligence Will Influence Healthcare Policy

A prominent part of healthcare’s future rides the still-cresting wave of innovation in artificial intelligence (AI). Half a decade ago, AI hardly made a ripple in the realm of healthcare applications. But by the end of 2018, equity funding for healthcare AI startups had reached $4.3 billion, with deal activity (576 transactions) surging past all other industries since 2013, according to research firm CB Insights.

A separate analysis from faculty experts at Boston-based health system Partners HealthCare concludes that AI will deliver a wide range of tangible benefits in care delivery by 2020. Radiology leads the way, with emerging applications for rapid disease detection, complex image assessment, and cost-effective clinical testing. Partners also expects AI breakthroughs in:

  • identifying patients at high risk for self-harm;
  • automation of high-volume tasks for triaging patients;
  • monitoring brain health to predict seizures and onset of dementia;
  • facilitating health information exchange;
  • streamlining coding and billing processes;
  • enabling voice-command technology through natural language processing and smart appliances; and
  • smartphone-based therapies for mental health conditions such as depression and substance abuse.

Real-Time Activity

Impending opportunities appear close to reaching fruition. Big-name vendors already have their hands in the AI market, with the recent HIMSS19 conference giving glimpses of new product pathways.

For instance, IBM Watson Health projects that medical data will double every 73 days by 2020, while physicians will spend twice as much time on administrative tasks than on interactions with patients. Working with partners, the company offers AI solutions aimed at identifying claims fraud and waste, decision-support tools that provide evidence-based drug information within a hospital’s workflow, and a mobile personal-assistant app that provides diabetes patients with actionable glucose insights.

Elsewhere, EHR provider Cerner is using AI within its suite of systems to identify gaps and inconsistencies in patient records. The firm believes AI-powered workflows will bring improvements to patient safety and leverage technology to counteract physician fatigue and frustration with EHR complexity.

These types of initiatives “can get us to what we’ve been missing for decades now, which is the true care in healthcare,” says futurist and practicing cardiologist Eric Topol, MD, author of Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again. Topol explains that AI will not only reduce errors made by doctors but also help them make better care decisions as a matter of course.

Policies for AI Progress

Still, industry observers recognize that AI’s progress will depend in part on careful stewardship in its implementation. At Cleveland Clinic, Susannah Rose, associate chief experience officer, emphasizes that AI applications need to be closely monitored and rigorously tested. The policy is shaping up to “keep what needs to be human, human — and then come back in and automate those things that don’t need the human touch,” Rose notes.

Additionally, the American Medical Association (AMA) has gone on record in support of “thoughtfully designed, high-quality, clinically validated healthcare AI.” The development process should integrate the perspectives of practicing physicians, according to an AMA policy statement. Specifically, AMA backs AI developed under best practices in user-centered design, where users are physicians and other members of the care team. The technology should also conform to standards for reproducibility and safeguard the privacy and security of individuals’ personal information.

NetDirector stays certified and up-to-date on common policy and compliance needs in healthcare — such as those currently taking shape with AI. The company structures its HealthData Exchange platform so that providers can focus on delivering care, instead of managing technology.

For more information on how AI may interact with current technologies and future developments, please contact us or request a free demo.

HIEs Vie with Other Innovators to Make Interoperability Gains

In late March, the health information exchange (HIE) spanning Kansas and Missouri announced a new capability that will enable participating providers to monitor acute and post-acute patient care events in real time. The not-for-profit Lewis and Clark Information Exchange (LACIE) said its notification platform also supplies contextual information, including patients’ utilization patterns, to providers at the point of care to help coordinate transitions.

“Improving our region’s overall health and economic status rests on a foundation of delivering common capabilities for every type of provider, no matter the EHR they use, and no matter where in the region they are,” commented Jeffrey Hackman, MD, chief medical information officer at Truman Medical Centers, a LACIE participant.

Across the country, not all HIE efforts are going so smoothly. For example, Connecticut is on its fourth attempt to create a statewide HIE, mired in a decade-long implementation process at a cost of more than $20 million. Similarly, Vermont’s HIE has struggled to gain traction after a 2017 analysis found the exchange to be largely unpopulated with patient records, despite having received over $44 million in state and local funding.

The Drive to Share Data

While state and regional HIEs battle inconsistency, the entire landscape for data-sharing and information exchange is rapidly changing. A proposed policy rule released in February by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) calls for clinical and administrative information to travel with patients throughout their transitions of care, and for such information to be electronically available on-demand through an application programming interface. Enrollees in Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, Medicare Advantage plans must have immediate electronic access to claims and other health information by 2020, the proposed rule stipulates.

Meanwhile, collaboration between vendor-neutral trade association CommonWell Health Alliance and public-private interoperability framework Carequality has yielded a working model for health systems to request and retrieve medical records from out-of-network providers, regardless of the EHR they use. Two Louisiana health systems, Lafayette General Health and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, launched a CommonWell-Carequality pilot project in December 2018, and have since electronically shared more than 200,000 documents.

“When data is made readily available, providers can make diagnostic and treatment decisions more quickly, and patients can recover sooner,” noted David Callecod, president of Lafayette General Health. “Better data means better communication with our patients and providers, better care and better outcomes.”

Along those lines, there’s ample opportunity for differing HIE and EHR initiatives to come together.

John Kansky, CEO of Indiana Health Information Exchange, recently remarked, “Many HIEs are still going strong and making great progress, even on the national level.” Yet, while acknowledging that efforts by the likes of Commonwell and Carequality are “assets in the equation of making the nation more interoperable,” Kansky pointed out that HIEs often “have that last mile wired and/or have data available — and in some cases have it in normalized, curated repositories, ready to be exchanged.”

As such, high-performing HIEs should be viewed by the EHR vendor community as potential resources — not necessarily competitors — in certain markets.

NetDirector offers standards-based technology designed to integrate with state and regional HIEs as necessary and dictated by providers. The company’s cloud-based HealthData Exchange platform streamlines data/document flow, avoiding the need for slow or costly individual integrations.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

NetDirector Client Conference 2019 Recap

Healthcare Integration: Expectation vs Reality

Competition among providers can drive greater healthcare value; however, in reality, the industry has been moving in the opposite direction — toward consolidation.

There were 90 hospital and health system mergers/ acquisitions during 2018, with average seller revenue reaching a historic high of $409 million, according to advisory firm Kaufman Hall, which has been tracking such metrics over the past decade.

“Health system leaders are seeking to acquire organizations that bring embedded expertise and resources to the deal, making these transactions more of a strategic partnership than an asset acquisition,” reports Kaufman Hall.

Integration’s Role

In many cases, strategic consolidation rides on a quest for improved information-sharing made possible by establishing a common electronic health record (EHR) system among M&A partners. As the theory goes, “EHR integration could [lower] operating costs by reducing redundant IT staffing and achieving economies of scale in costly ongoing system maintenance,” states a newly published Health Affairs study. What’s more, integration can help narrow information gaps as patients move across diverse care delivery sites.

Nonetheless, actual experience in the field paints a different picture. The Health Affairs research, based on American Hospital Association data, finds that of 88 hospitals acquired between 2012 and 2014, only one-third switched to the EHR system of the acquiring organization, while 44 percent remained on a different EHR.

“Our results suggest that one important avenue by which consolidation may result in lower-cost, higher quality care is not routinely occurring,” the study authors write. “This should be cause for continued concern that many acquired hospitals may not deliver on their promised benefits.”

Integration Headwinds

Healthcare organizations transitioning to a new EHR often run into difficulties when the old system’s data is stored in a proprietary format that can’t be deployed without first being converted into a standardized structure. To make matters worse, “outgoing” EHR vendors sometimes take weeks or months to carry out a required data conversion.

“If your patient records are not provided in a format that makes them fully accessible in your new EHR, healthcare professionals may be unable to rely on clinical decision support tools … [for functions such as] automated drug interaction checking and allergy reminders,” The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) warns. “Further, if data is not provided in an appropriate format, you will incur the time and costs associated with converting the data to a usable format.”

Additionally, integrations can fall victim to other problems such as:

  • failing to get practical input from key system users during planning and implementation;
  • understaffing the process of extracting, moving, manipulating and repopulating large data volumes;
  • moving duplicate or obsolete data into the new system;
  • not moving all relevant documentation into the new system; and
  • choosing incomplete patient data instead of validated, real-world scripts for end-user testing.

Tightening Up Integration with the Right Approach

Despite inherent challenges, integration will continue to be a core element in healthcare’s pursuit of value-based care and operational excellence. That’s why it’s so important for healthcare providers to choose the right integration partner and methodology.

NetDirector specializes in automated integration for entities across the healthcare ecosystem, from physician practices to hospitals and health systems and affiliated facilities such as labs and radiology clinics. Our team of dedicated professionals can assess individual requirements and map out a cost-effective and efficient plan for successful integration.

To learn more about NetDirector’s cloud-based data exchange and integration platform and additional services, please contact us or request a free demo.

RSNA Dives Deep on Artificial Intelligence for Radiologists

The commercial market for artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of over 68 percent through the 2018-2022 timespan, according to industry researcher Frost & Sullivan. Driving the expansion: a tangible shift from innovation to adoption of AI among radiologists, because new tools are proving useful in the field.

For instance, the University of Utah Health is putting AI to work compiling patients’ prior scans, as opposed to physicians having to manually search archived images. And at Capital Health Hospitals, AI-based clinical software detects intracranial hemorrhages in CT scans and flags them for immediate attention.

New Platform for AI Research

Amidst this fast-developing setting, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) recently launched an online journal, Radiology: Artificial Intelligence, which highlights emerging AI applications across multiple imaging disciplines.

“AI and radiology do not exist in isolation,” explains the publication’s editor, Charles Kahn, MD. “[These] technologies will help us care for our patients more effectively and humanely. Our goal is not to replace, but rather to extend our human abilities to provide medical care — and to improve the lives of those we are privileged to serve.”

At the journal’s core will be validated scientific research papers that show AI’s impact in extracting information, diagnosing and managing diseases, streamlining radiology workflow and improving healthcare outcomes. Expect coverage of image segmentation and reconstruction, automated detection of abnormalities, diagnostic reasoning, natural language processing, clinical workflow analysis, and radiogenomics, as well as novel applications and innovative applications.

The debut issue, published January 30, includes analysis of automated fracture detection and localization on wrist radiographs, and classification of elbow fractures using a “deep learning” approach that emulates radiologist decision-making. A special report looks at how AI provides standardization, consistency, and dependability in support of human radiologists. An opinion piece peers over the horizon at “augmented radiology,” a practice in which technology will amplify human insight, particularly in medical education and training.

Toward Full AI Integration

As pointed out in NetDirector’s blog post “Artificial Intelligence Set to Soar in Healthcare,” AI’s future success rides on use cases where the technology not only helps to improve clinical outcomes but also delivers a clear return on investment. In doing so, it needs to be fully integrated into radiology departments’ user interfaces and workflows.

Areas to watch include breast and lung imaging for cancer discovery, neurological imaging for stroke detection and non-invasive imaging for diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The technology works in the background to support radiologists’ knowledge and efficiency while offering readily accessible tools for specific purposes as needed.

Undoubtedly, an ongoing challenge will be assimilating health data across diverse platforms and connecting multiple data sources. NetDirector’s cloud-based HealthData Exchange platform ensures strong integration for fast-rising AI applications, bolstered by an existing footprint in radiology and imaging centers.

To find out more about HealthData Exchange and how it could help leverage AI applications, please contact us or request a free demo.

Interoperability Captures Spotlight at HIMSS19

Interoperability Captures Spotlight at HIMSS19

HIMSS19, health IT’s most expansive conference, kicked off on Feb. 11 with the release of a new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed policy rule detailing the agency’s vision for advancing industry-wide interoperability and patient access to health information.

“We believe patients should have the ability to move from health plan to health plan, provider to provider, and have both their clinical and administrative information travel with them throughout their journey,” according to the rule’s statement of purpose.

CMS Administrator Seema Verma’s public comments during the meeting added depth and clarity: “We are promoting scalable data sharing, not just an individual patient record from hospital-to-hospital, but a model that supports the flow of information across the entire healthcare system. We encourage industry to align in this direction because this is the future.”

Practical Application

The CMS proposed rule would give patients access to their health information electronically through an application programming interface (API). At the same time, providers could obtain their patients’ health information, regardless of previous sites of care. On the flip side, providers would not be able to restrict information flow to other providers and payers. Additionally, CMS expects payers and third parties to develop software that would ensure seamless data availability when patients change providers, health plans or issuers.

The rule’s timeline is aggressive. CMS stipulated that Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, Medicare Advantage plans and Qualified Health Plans in federally facilitated insurance exchanges must be equipped to give enrollees immediate electronic access to claims and other health information by 2020.

Concurrent with the CMS rulemaking, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), which guides national efforts on health IT implementation/ usage and electronic information exchange, unveiled its own rule on data blocking. The ONC rule implements provisions spelled out by law in the 21st Century Cures Act, which Congress passed in 2016. The rule also provides exceptions to the law’s definition of information blocking. Aside from potential fines (up to $1 million per instance) applicable to health information exchanges, providers or hospitals that block information would be publicly named by CMS.

ONC National Coordinator Donald Rucker, MD, a closing speaker at HIMSS19, told attendees that, in the final analysis, patients should be empowered to access their health data “through a [smartphone] app of their choice, at no additional cost.” Rucker added, “Patients should be able to attach their smartphone to the provider’s endpoint and get their medical data … That’s what modern technology allows.”

Open APIs required for deployment of data sharing under the proposed rules would be based on HL7’s FHIR standard.

Additional Considerations

While early reaction to the CMS/ONC rulemaking has been mostly positive, the American Hospital Association (AHA) opposes a requirement that providers electronically notify other providers when a patient is discharged or moved to another hospital. “We cannot support including electronic event notification as a condition for participation for Medicare and Medicaid,” according to a prepared AHA statement. “We believe that CMS already has better levers to ensure the exchange of appropriate health information for patients. We recommend the agency focus on building this exchange infrastructure rather than layering additional requirements on hospitals,” the statement concluded.

Privacy and security considerations should also be factored into the mix during the 60-day public-comment period for the CMS and ONC rules. Cybersecurity executive Mac McMillan noted, “[The agencies] said, ‘We want you to be more open, but you still have to protect the data.’ Typically, those two things don’t go hand-in-hand … Folks are going to be very concerned they are on the hook for any downstream incidents that occur as a result of openness they have with third-party developers.”

Ahead of the Curve

NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange platform aligns well with the regulatory landscape inherent in the CMS and ONC rulemaking. In short, interoperability’s focus should be on the patient.

HealthData Exchange allows providers and vendors to electronically move clinical and financial data among disparate information systems while adhering to HIPAA and HL7 compliance standards. Less time spent on technology and inputting data frees up providers to deliver an improved patient experience by integrating information flow throughout the continuum of care.

To learn more about NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange platform, please contact us or request a free demo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NetDirector Teams with DocPanel to Provide Rapid Integration and Data Consistency for Radiology Reads and Reports

From PRNewswire:

Tampa, FL – December 13, 2018 – NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange, and integration platform, has expanded their healthcare data-trading ecosystem by partnering with DocPanel, a digital community of highly-skilled subspecialty radiologists who provide radiology interpretations for both healthcare providers and patients.

With a shared vision founded on providing exceptional patient care and leveraging technology to increase interoperability in healthcare organizations, DocPanel and NetDirector have moved forward with their partnership to increase the ease of deployment and level of integration available to both DocPanel, and the healthcare providers that they engage with.

DocPanel’s network of over 300 board-certified, highly distinguished radiologists across 41 states and academic institutions provide unparalleled specialization. NetDirector’s cloud-based integration-platform-as-a-service (iPaaS) model will make specialty care more rapidly accessible and easier to leverage for the providers who are directly servicing the patients by handling the complex integrations and variety of systems that are ubiquitous in the world of modern-day medical imaging data.

“DocPanel was built to make it possible for imaging providers to receive the best possible radiology interpretations available, no matter where they are,” states Cate Lloyd, COO of DocPanel. “By partnering with NetDirector, together we will make that world-class service easier to access and more cost-effective and interoperable for both the initial provider and the participating radiologist, ensuring sustainability and availability for all participants,” she continued.

DocPanel is initially utilizing NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange to receive digital orders from customers and return diagnostic results back to its ecosystem of Imaging Centers. NetDirector allows them to fast-track onboarding of new trading partners and significantly reduce IT resource overhead to maintain a multitude of data interfaces. They are also looking to potentially expand services by utilizing NetDirector’s new DICOM image converter to automate the inclusion of PDFs to DICOM directly into the radiologist’s reading protocols and eliminate on-premise licensed software.

Additionally, NetDirector’s new Health Data Monitor (HDM) makes the whole integration environment easier to monitor and maintain compliance than ever before. Network participants are notified of delays or connectivity concerns in real time through the HDM dashboard and can respond as needed or engage with their dedicated integration analyst who are domain experts in healthcare workflow and integration technologies.

“Partnering with DocPanel is very exciting – they are at the forefront of their industry, much like we are,” said Harry Beisswenger, CEO of NetDirector. “Being able to provide a strong and secure integration solution, while simultaneously reducing costs, ensures that the amazing services provided by DocPanel’s team of radiologists can be accessed in a simple and straight-forward way.”

About NetDirector:

NetDirector provides a secure cloud-based data and document exchange solution for the healthcare and mortgage banking industries to deliver seamless data integration between parties. NetDirector bridges gaps created by disparate systems & technologies by allowing companies at any location to share data & documents securely over a single internet connection with any other member of the ecosystem. Our approach allows trading partners to collaborate and exchange data in a seamless, bi-directional, real-time manner. With security and longevity as a focus, NetDirector is a certified HIPAA Compliant company, a 6-year member of the prominent Inc. 5000, and currently processes more than 10 million transactions per month.

About DocPanel

DocPanel is the world’s first subspecialty radiologist marketplace bringing together the largest network of fellowship-trained radiologists across every major subspecialty into one single online platform. DocPanel’s subspecialty radiologists offer final reads and educational consultations to imaging centers and radiology groups, and second opinions to clients and patients across the United States and the world. The company offers a new flexible and customizable model of subspecialty radiology to help overcome challenges related to errors, high costs, staff shortages and more.

Why Interoperability Still Matters

When HIMSS asked hospital leaders to rate their most pressing 2018 concerns, “Health Information Exchange, Interoperability and Data Integration” ranked a rather middling 13th out of 24 total IT priorities. On a scale of 1 to 7, where 1 meant “not a priority” and 7 designated an “essential priority,” respondents gave interoperability a group score of 4.85.

Consider that outcome against the top 5 priorities among hospital respondents:

  1. Patient Safety 6.07
  2. Privacy, Security and Cybersecurity 5.90
  3. Process Improvement, Workflow, Change Management 5.70
  4. Data Analytics/Clinical and Business Intelligence 5.50
  5. Clinical Informatics and Clinician Engagement 5.50

Compared to 2017, “Leadership, Governance, Strategic Planning” and “Connected Health and Telehealth” jumped ahead of “Health Information Exchange, Interoperability and Data Integration” in this year’s priority ranking.

Nonetheless, the HIMSS survey findings shouldn’t be construed to mean that interoperability has fallen off the boardroom table as a point of emphasis. Instead, the onus for achieving interoperability may be shifting from internal IT departments to collaborative colleagues in the commercial health IT sector. In fact, vendors and consultants surveyed by HIMSS rated interoperability as their 2nd highest current priority, with a mean score of 5.60.

One key aspect of what’s in play here is that 75 percent of hospitals are dealing with 10+ disparate electronic health record (EHR) systems in use at affiliated practices, while only 2 percent of hospitals use a single vendor’s EHR.

Vendors will have to work toward agreement on interoperability standards, not only as it applies to their customers’ reimbursement under value-based payment models but also “because of consumer demand as things like Apple Health Records gain traction,” according to Blain Newton, executive vice president of HIMSS Analytics. He added, “You’re going to see consumer health apps that have been playing at the fringes now be able to plug into the mothership and pull data from it, add to it.”

A Milestone for Progress

Despite pending challenges, the future looks promising for emerging interoperability initiatives. In mid-November, Carequality and CommonWell Health Alliance, two of the nation’s largest interoperability communities, announced that mutually enabled healthcare providers would be able to connect and bilaterally exchange data via leading EHR vendors.

Approximately 80 percent of U.S. hospitals and ambulatory offices use EHR systems that are part of either Carequality or Commonwell, noted Micky Tripathi, CEO of the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative. “Imagine a mobile wireless world where Verizon and AT&T weren’t connected—both networks provide great services to their own customers, but you couldn’t talk to anyone on the other network,” he explained. “This milestone is [on] that level of significance for interoperability.”

Further, providers who have already invested in integration know that it directly impacts interoperability. Technology that streamlines payment processing alleviates non-value-added time spent on documentation and processes required for maximized reimbursement.

A recent case study shows how front-end benefit verification enabled American Health Imaging (AHI) to reduce labor costs by about $480,000 annually through integration and automation on NetDirector’s cloud-based data exchange service.

Click here to read the entire AHI case study.