Posts

NetDirector Teams with DocPanel to Provide Rapid Integration and Data Consistency for Radiology Reads and Reports

From PRNewswire:

Tampa, FL – December 13, 2018 – NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange, and integration platform, has expanded their healthcare data-trading ecosystem by partnering with DocPanel, a digital community of highly-skilled subspecialty radiologists who provide radiology interpretations for both healthcare providers and patients.

With a shared vision founded on providing exceptional patient care and leveraging technology to increase interoperability in healthcare organizations, DocPanel and NetDirector have moved forward with their partnership to increase the ease of deployment and level of integration available to both DocPanel, and the healthcare providers that they engage with.

DocPanel’s network of over 300 board-certified, highly distinguished radiologists across 41 states and academic institutions provide unparalleled specialization. NetDirector’s cloud-based integration-platform-as-a-service (iPaaS) model will make specialty care more rapidly accessible and easier to leverage for the providers who are directly servicing the patients by handling the complex integrations and variety of systems that are ubiquitous in the world of modern-day medical imaging data.

“DocPanel was built to make it possible for imaging providers to receive the best possible radiology interpretations available, no matter where they are,” states Cate Lloyd, COO of DocPanel. “By partnering with NetDirector, together we will make that world-class service easier to access and more cost-effective and interoperable for both the initial provider and the participating radiologist, ensuring sustainability and availability for all participants,” she continued.

DocPanel is initially utilizing NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange to receive digital orders from customers and return diagnostic results back to its ecosystem of Imaging Centers. NetDirector allows them to fast-track onboarding of new trading partners and significantly reduce IT resource overhead to maintain a multitude of data interfaces. They are also looking to potentially expand services by utilizing NetDirector’s new DICOM image converter to automate the inclusion of PDFs to DICOM directly into the radiologist’s reading protocols and eliminate on-premise licensed software.

Additionally, NetDirector’s new Health Data Monitor (HDM) makes the whole integration environment easier to monitor and maintain compliance than ever before. Network participants are notified of delays or connectivity concerns in real time through the HDM dashboard and can respond as needed or engage with their dedicated integration analyst who are domain experts in healthcare workflow and integration technologies.

“Partnering with DocPanel is very exciting – they are at the forefront of their industry, much like we are,” said Harry Beisswenger, CEO of NetDirector. “Being able to provide a strong and secure integration solution, while simultaneously reducing costs, ensures that the amazing services provided by DocPanel’s team of radiologists can be accessed in a simple and straight-forward way.”

About NetDirector:

NetDirector provides a secure cloud-based data and document exchange solution for the healthcare and mortgage banking industries to deliver seamless data integration between parties. NetDirector bridges gaps created by disparate systems & technologies by allowing companies at any location to share data & documents securely over a single internet connection with any other member of the ecosystem. Our approach allows trading partners to collaborate and exchange data in a seamless, bi-directional, real-time manner. With security and longevity as a focus, NetDirector is a certified HIPAA Compliant company, a 6-year member of the prominent Inc. 5000, and currently processes more than 10 million transactions per month.

About DocPanel

DocPanel is the world’s first subspecialty radiologist marketplace bringing together the largest network of fellowship-trained radiologists across every major subspecialty into one single online platform. DocPanel’s subspecialty radiologists offer final reads and educational consultations to imaging centers and radiology groups, and second opinions to clients and patients across the United States and the world. The company offers a new flexible and customizable model of subspecialty radiology to help overcome challenges related to errors, high costs, staff shortages and more.

Why Interoperability Still Matters

When HIMSS asked hospital leaders to rate their most pressing 2018 concerns, “Health Information Exchange, Interoperability and Data Integration” ranked a rather middling 13th out of 24 total IT priorities. On a scale of 1 to 7, where 1 meant “not a priority” and 7 designated an “essential priority,” respondents gave interoperability a group score of 4.85.

Consider that outcome against the top 5 priorities among hospital respondents:

  1. Patient Safety 6.07
  2. Privacy, Security and Cybersecurity 5.90
  3. Process Improvement, Workflow, Change Management 5.70
  4. Data Analytics/Clinical and Business Intelligence 5.50
  5. Clinical Informatics and Clinician Engagement 5.50

Compared to 2017, “Leadership, Governance, Strategic Planning” and “Connected Health and Telehealth” jumped ahead of “Health Information Exchange, Interoperability and Data Integration” in this year’s priority ranking.

Nonetheless, the HIMSS survey findings shouldn’t be construed to mean that interoperability has fallen off the boardroom table as a point of emphasis. Instead, the onus for achieving interoperability may be shifting from internal IT departments to collaborative colleagues in the commercial health IT sector. In fact, vendors and consultants surveyed by HIMSS rated interoperability as their 2nd highest current priority, with a mean score of 5.60.

One key aspect of what’s in play here is that 75 percent of hospitals are dealing with 10+ disparate electronic health record (EHR) systems in use at affiliated practices, while only 2 percent of hospitals use a single vendor’s EHR.

Vendors will have to work toward agreement on interoperability standards, not only as it applies to their customers’ reimbursement under value-based payment models but also “because of consumer demand as things like Apple Health Records gain traction,” according to Blain Newton, executive vice president of HIMSS Analytics. He added, “You’re going to see consumer health apps that have been playing at the fringes now be able to plug into the mothership and pull data from it, add to it.”

A Milestone for Progress

Despite pending challenges, the future looks promising for emerging interoperability initiatives. In mid-November, Carequality and CommonWell Health Alliance, two of the nation’s largest interoperability communities, announced that mutually enabled healthcare providers would be able to connect and bilaterally exchange data via leading EHR vendors.

Approximately 80 percent of U.S. hospitals and ambulatory offices use EHR systems that are part of either Carequality or Commonwell, noted Micky Tripathi, CEO of the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative. “Imagine a mobile wireless world where Verizon and AT&T weren’t connected—both networks provide great services to their own customers, but you couldn’t talk to anyone on the other network,” he explained. “This milestone is [on] that level of significance for interoperability.”

Further, providers who have already invested in integration know that it directly impacts interoperability. Technology that streamlines payment processing alleviates non-value-added time spent on documentation and processes required for maximized reimbursement.

A recent case study shows how front-end benefit verification enabled American Health Imaging (AHI) to reduce labor costs by about $480,000 annually through integration and automation on NetDirector’s cloud-based data exchange service.

Click here to read the entire AHI case study.

 

 

New VPN Network Monitoring Enhancements and Alerts

Monitoring that’s a cut above!

NetDirector is excited to announce an advanced VPN networking monitoring service that provides alerts and deep insight to help healthcare clients quickly identify and troubleshoot VPN issues and to ensure systems are running smoothly. This service provides:

Continuous Monitoring – NetDirector’s advanced VPN monitoring solution runs 24/7/365 gathering critical data about transactional and network performance that provides a quick insight into current & potential network and transactional anomalies.

The Complete Picture – Proactive alerts and insights are available when transactions are not being received or acknowledged by a targeted facility. Our VPN monitoring can help pinpoint where the issues are occurring, from NetDirector to the facility, including network layer.

Choose your Alert Delivery – Alerts can be delivered via email, text, or both.

Please contact your integration analyst if you’re interested!

Apple Leads Big-Name Tech Charge Focusing on Health Data

Apple’s $921 billion market valuation, perched atop the Fortune 500, reflects investors’ belief that the company’s relentless growth should continue in coming years. And an iPhone-based health record product, a test version of which Apple released in late January, could be a pivotal part of the expected progression.

“We view the future as consumers owning their own health data,” Apple COO Jeff Williams told CNBC.

The new Health Records section, accessible from the iPhone’s Health app, lets users stream in encrypted data (e.g., allergies, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, procedures and vital signs) from leading EHR systems. The idea empowers consumers to share passcode-protected data on-demand with their primary care doctor or hospital personnel.

As of March, nearly 40 U.S. hospitals had signed on to participate in Apple’s Health Records project.

Industry Reaction

David Harlow, who heads a healthcare law and consulting practice, pointed out the long-term promise inherent in Apple’s initiative: allowing more people than ever before to access their own health data more easily. If the pilot succeeds, he added, healthcare systems of all sizes across the country would be able to connect their respective EHRs to the Apple conduit.

Indeed, among a dozen Health Records beta sites interviewed by research firm KLAS Enterprises, all recognized the product’s potential to facilitate patient-provider interaction and help consumers improve care self-management. Patient record portability should be possible soon, according to 59 percent of beta testers, with associated benefits (giving patients access to their data, using the data to engage patients, and integrating data into patient care) expected within six months.

At the same time, however, Harlow cautioned that Apple faces several short-term challenges:

  1. Health Records is currently limited to personal health record data, not the full scope of EHR data.
  2. iPhone users account for only 15 percent of the overall smartphone market (although physician iPhone usage hovers around 75 percent).
  3. The pilot’s relatively small size limits demonstration of data integration from multiple provider organizations.
  4. Data flows only in one direction — from provider to patient.

Harlow concluded that it’s not yet possible to predict whether Health Records will become ubiquitous, although consumer advocates like Apple’s approach to handling end-user data. (It stays on the phone and Apple won’t be mining it for other purposes.)

Nonetheless, a practical consideration — some patients have to pay their provider more than $500 for a single medical records request, while others encounter an annual subscription fee, according to a recent Government Accountability Office report — could disrupt emerging data-sharing models. In this environment, Apple has gotten a head start on allowing patients to own and control their health data, even across disparate systems.

Integration in the Healthcare Ecosystem

NetDirector views these developments in a positive light as they relate to integration advances across healthcare. If Health Records and similar projects take flight, cloud-based platforms such as NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange will assist with streamlined adoption and implementation. The net result will be the ability for healthcare stakeholders to quickly and accurately put in place patient-centric services.

For more information on HealthData Exchange, please contact us or request a free demo.

Security in Data Migration, and When Not to Migrate

There’s no turning back on the cloud computing revolution. By 2020, more than 90 percent of data center traffic will be cloud traffic, according to Cisco’s Global Cloud Index forecast.

Separate analysis from 451 Research finds enterprise spending on hosting and cloud services up by 26 percent in 2017 over 2016, outpacing a 12 percent increase in total IT budgets during the same span. “Hosting and cloud services are becoming a focus of IT investment, via both new projects and the migration of existing workloads,” observes Liam Eagle, research manager at the firm.

In healthcare, 76 percent of new or existing workloads are moving to the cloud, in areas such as data archiving, backups/disaster recovery, back-office applications and server virtualization.

Some might even say the transition to cloud is happening too quickly. In fact, the simplicity of initiating cloud projects has raised eyebrows among industry observers — especially since protected health information (PHI) is at stake. “The ease of spinning up a cloud application can create, in and of itself, a risk,” says Shane Whitlatch, enterprise vice president at data security firm FairWarning. “Because cloud projects are easy to start, it’s also easy to just leave them there and not monitor them.”

Does he have a point?

Setting the record straight

Without a doubt, companies across all industries have made some missteps in migrating data to the cloud. In certain cases, organizations have viewed data migration as a one-time event rather a process that will likely be repeated over the years. Therefore, it’s important to analyze whether an IT infrastructure can hold up to the demands of a full-scale migration, reports HealthITInfrastructure.

Closer to home in healthcare, organizations often fail to assess data-quality issues before embarking on a migration. This might come into play, for example, when moving data from a legacy electronic health record (EHR) system to a new EHR application.

And while it’s certainly possible for a healthcare provider to fall victim to the scenario Whitlatch envisions (e.g., gathering PHI for research purposes and later abandoning that data outside established controls on a cloud-based platform), most organizations would avoid that type of vulnerability through due diligence. They recognize that cybersecurity is a shared responsibility between cloud provider and customer. HIPAA’s Security Rule, for instance, applies in equal force to data protection whether the data resides in on-premise systems or in the cloud.

Additionally, above all other factors, healthcare organizations are concerned about adherence to regulatory requirements such as HIPAA when selecting a cloud services provider, according to a 2016 study conducted by HIMSS Analytics.

NetDirector’s HealthData Exchange, a cloud-based platform for exchanging data between healthcare entities, has been certified as HIPAA-compliant under audit by a third-party security and compliance solutions provider. This certification “strengthens the trust that our clients place in us to safely integrate their platforms and transform their data,” explains NetDirector CEO Harry Beisswenger.

For more information on the HealthData Exchange platform, please contact us or request a free demo.

NetDirector Launches Powerful Integration with Equator® for Orders and Deliverables

Tampa, FL – May 9, 2017 – NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has spent several months working alongside Equator, the leading provider of default software solutions for servicers, real estate agents, vendors and other mortgage and real estate industry professionals. The work has yielded a powerful zero-footprint integration option for default servicing firms utilizing Equator.

Equator’s infrastructure software as a service (iSaaS) solutions include EQ Workstation®, EQ Marketplace®, Midsource™ and EQAgent®/EQVendor® portals, which can be used a la carte or as an end-to-end solution. Equator’s REO, short sale and loss mitigation modules processed over $21 billion in transactions in 2015, and have processed more than $315 billion in transactions since its inception. Currently, 4 of the top 5 U.S servicers and the largest holder of real estate are on the Equator platform. With such a high volume of mortgage banking transactions taking place with Equator, it was an easy next step for NetDirector to develop the one-to-many style integration that has fueled their integration platform-as-a-service (iPaaS) business model tailored to the Equator platform.

“NetDirector has worked very closely with us to not only develop, but to thoroughly test this powerful integration suite for default servicing attorneys,” said James N. Vinci, Chief Technology Officer of the Equator business. “We’re excited to collaborate with them, and we believe this collaboration will generate serious efficiency for attorney firms utilizing Equator.”

The initial integration launch includes “Orders” and “Deliverables”, which resemble the referrals and events that are utilized by other industry standard software interfaces in the default servicing sphere. The “Deliverables” also allow for certain documents to be uploaded and other transactions and processes are on the table for future development. Automating these transactions through a cloud-based integration platform provides increases to efficiency through reduced data entry and automated processes. It also significantly reduces the labor stresses of developing and maintaining the integration internally at the attorney’s cost.

“Our ecosystem continues to expand with yet another powerhouse in the industry as we welcome Equator as a new participant,” said Harry Beisswenger, NetDirector CEO. “Our goal is to provide the integrations to default servicing firms that offer the most value, and there has been a major demand for this service. We look forward to the prospect of further data and document integration with the Equator platform in the future.”

Company Bio:

NetDirector provides a secure cloud-based data and document exchange solution for the healthcare and mortgage banking industries to deliver seamless data integration between parties. NetDirector bridges gaps created by disparate systems & technologies by allowing companies at any location to share data & documents securely over a single internet connection with any other member of the ecosystem. Our approach allows trading partners to collaborate and exchange data in a seamless, bi-directional, real-time manner. With security and longevity as a focus, NetDirector is a certified SOC 2 Type II Compliant company, a 6-year member of the prominent Inc. 5000, and currently, processes more than 8 million transactions per month.

Healthcare Data in 2017 – Looking Forward to Progress

IT executives in healthcare face an expanding array of challenges in 2017 as the industry takes initial steps away from transactional-based, fee-for-service models and toward reimbursements tied to measures of value and quality. The clock has started ticking on Medicare reform’s implementation, with provider performance data gathered this year providing the basis for physician payments in 2019.

“To succeed in the value-based environment, health systems need to invest heavily in technology,” reports the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions.

The following areas should see significant impact.

IT as a key enabler

Healthcare organizations are recognizing IT’s mission-critical role in ensuring continuous high availability of systems and support of operational commitments, according to the 2016 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. Fifty-two percent of healthcare CIOs expect their IT budget to increase over the next 12 months, compared to 45 percent across all industries. The boards of healthcare companies also place a higher priority than their counterparts in other industries on increasing operational efficiencies, improving business processes and delivering business intelligence/ analytics. Additionally, the report finds that “cloud and other collaborative digital technology enhancements have improved health IT access, scalability, reliability and sustainability.”

Interoperability essentials

Healthcare CIOs are enthusiastic about the transition to value-based models of care, but they admit it will be a tough task to actually implement population health management programs that can pull data from multiple organizations and analyze that information with a predictive component. Interoperability of data and technology will be an essential lever in making population health and wellness a reality. “Continuity-of-care documents, electronic health records (EHRs) and other types of data must all come together in an organized, orderly marriage,” observes Transcend Insights, Humana’s population health subsidiary. “A health information exchange for data and Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) for application interfacing [will be] the easiest route forward.”

Interoperability also tops the list of EHR development projects slated for 2017, according to a Healthcare IT News survey of health technology executives. Specifically, respondents say top EHR projects will be geared toward improving interoperability, workflow and usability, as well as adding population health tools and migrating to the cloud. “EHRs were put in basically as dumb data communication systems without emphasis on exchange and workflow,” explains John Halamka, MD, CIO at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess health system. “But because of payment reform, we have incentives to do data exchange. Different things are bubbling to the top.”

Opportunity in digital health

Digital health tools such as health-related apps, activity trackers and smart watches have the potential to help consumers become more engaged in their own health. Unfortunately, that’s not happening yet. For instance, 75 percent of consumers who use mobile or Internet-connected health apps are willing to share the data they collect with their provider; however, only 32 percent say that type of exchange actually takes place, according to a digital health survey conducted by HealthMine. Additionally, 60 percent of digital health users say they have electronic health records, but only 22 percent use them to make medical decisions. HealthMine CEO Bryce Williams says, “Digital health is still crossing the chasm from lifestyle and fitness management to chronic disease and holistic healthcare management.” Williams looks for that gap to close during 2017 as health plan sponsors apply collected consumer health data to gain insights and manage populations toward improved health.

Tamper-proof technology

On December 12, Quest Diagnostics revealed that an unauthorized party obtained protected health information of approximately 34,000 individuals via an Internet application. Accessed data included names, dates of birth and lab results — but not Social Security numbers or credit card, insurance or other financial information. As such, it was a relatively mild intrusion measured against other data breaches during 2016. In comparison, a hacking of health insurer Anthem compromised tens of millions of patient records, all of which were stored unencrypted in a centralized database. In a New York Times op-ed, cybercrime expert Kathryn Haun and healthcare futurist Eric Topol call for a move away from health systems “storing and owning all our data.” They advocate for an encrypted data platform known as blockchain, which would “give patients digital wallets containing all their medical data, continually updated, that they can share at will.” The co-authors note that the private and academic sectors are working on the emerging technology.

Data in motion

Girish Pancha, CEO and founder of data flow management company StreamSets, views data as “the final frontier in the quest for continuous IT operations.” Pancha predicts 2017 will bring recognition of data management “as a living, breathing operation that must run reliably and automatically on a continuous basis” — on par with how IT oversees applications, networks and security. Organizations will need to analyze potential changes to their processes, tooling and structure to ensure the availability and accuracy of data in motion, he adds.

All told, it will be an eventful year with healthcare organizations planning for important challenges in their respective data and integration environments. NetDirector stands ready to assist with its proven cloud-based HealthData Exchange, which moves clinical records between providers and all trading partners in their ecosystem.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

Healthcare Year in Review: The Data Perspective

As 2016 comes to a close, major developments in health information technology reveal continuing storylines for the year to come. Here’s a brief overview of progress made and ongoing opportunities for health information exchange to surmount pending challenges.

Value-based care

Medicare and commercial insurers are moving quickly toward valued-based payment models, leaving fee-for-service behind. Nonetheless, the implementation of supporting technology remains a work in progress. The 2016 HIMSS Cost Accounting Survey reveals that about half of healthcare provider organizations participate in some type of alternative payment model, but only 3 percent believe they are highly prepared to make the pay-for-value transition. “It will be critical that the industry reaches some level of consistency in terms of how providers should manage the exchange of clinical and financial information between all parties involved in an episode of care, regardless of whether they are part of the same healthcare delivery system,” explains Pam Jodock, HIMSS’ senior director of health business solutions.

Legislation

On December 13, President Obama signed into law the broad-reaching 21st Century Cures Act, which makes significant investments aimed at solving some of the nation’s biggest health challenges. Among its many varied provisions, the Cures Act seeks to improve health IT interoperability by promoting complete access, exchange and use of all electronically accessible health information for authorized use under applicable state or federal law. The legislation puts a priority  — and calls for a Government Accountability Office study — on patient-matching technology that would accurately identify patients for electronic exchange of health information among providers.

Cloud computing

The shared-resources, data-on-demand model known as cloud computing continues to evolve as a trusted healthcare technology core component “underpinning the continued development of electronic health records and big data analytics,” reports HIT Infrastructure. This aligns with increased use of software-as-a-service offerings in areas such as clinical data systems and technical support desks as organizations look to lower costs and improve overall operations, according to research firm Gartner. Cloud security and compliance concerns remain in play, however, especially in the handling of health data and protected health information.

Data sharing

Data is seemly everywhere these days, continually growing, with much of it available to be shared. Despite concerns about the privacy and security of health data, 77 percent of respondents to Rock Health’s 2016 Digital Health Consumer Adoption Report are interested in sharing their health information — especially to get better care from their doctor. Among those surveyed, 79 percent said they would divulge their health history, physical activity (76 percent) and genetic data (64 percent) with a physician. On the flip side, in regard to accessing health information, it matters most to those in poor health. Twenty-eight percent of respondents who self-rated their health status as poor or bad highly desired an electronic copy of their health records, while only 19 percent of those in good health were as interested.

Behavioral health and special care innovation

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services projects treatment spending on mental and substance use disorders will total $280 billion in 2020. Including individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities and those who require long-term services and support because of chronic medical conditions or physical disabilities, more than 35 percent of U.S. annual healthcare expenditures flow toward care for groups that constitute less than 20 percent of the population. Efforts to understand population health risks and intervene with preventive care models that reduce costs and improve care have started to gain traction, reports CIO. In one such initiative, Quest Diagnostics is working with University of California San Francisco to tap a database of 20 billion lab test records, combined with a five-minute cognitive assessment, for early detection and treatment of dementia.

NetDirector’s cloud-based HealthData Exchange comes into play in many areas of the developments that have shaped health IT during 2016. The service not only facilitates EHR integration and streamlines clinical workflow and communications with the extended provider community, but also complements existing IT investments.

For more information, please contact us or request a free demo.

New Transaction Type: Invoice Status Request/Response

Transaction Spotlight: Fees and Costs Request